Trial by Error: NICE Rejects My FOI Request

David Tuller

 

By David Tuller, DrPH in Virology Blog.

 

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, the U.K. organization that develops clinical guidelines for medical conditions, has rejected my freedom-of-information request for the names of the experts involved in the reassessment of the guidance for the illness it calls CFS/ME. This isn’t surprising, since the agency also recently rejected similar requests from the Countess of Mar and the ME Association. However, NICE’s response to the FOI request, which I received on Friday, contains some useful information and clarifies the decision-making process. I have included the NICE response below, but here are some key observations.

The 2007 guidance, called CG53, endorsed cognitive behavior therapy and graded exercise therapy as the treatments of choice. According to the FOI response, the surveillance team that drew up the recently published “consultation document,” which recommends no change in this guidance, includes four NICE staffers: a technical analyst, a technical adviser, a clinical adviser and an associate director. In developing their proposal, they consulted with seven “topic experts”–three psychiatrists, two neurologists, a paediatrician and a patient representative.

 

The surveillance team’s provisional decision to leave the guidance as is triggered this month’s two-week period for receiving comments from stakeholders. The final call will now be made by a group of eight top NICE employees, collectively called the “guidance executive.” Among the eight are Sir Andrew Dillon, NICE’s chief executive; Mark Baker, director of the Centre for Clinical Practice; and communications director Jane Gizbert.

 

To read the rest of this story, click on the link below:

 

Link to ME Story

Leave a Reply

The York ME Community © 2015
Live Scores Powered by Maç Sonuçları