Why The Annual Winter Health Crisis Could Be Solved In Homes, Not Hospitals

NHS

 

By Richard Morris in The Conversation.

 

As winter continues, so does the usual soul searching about the state of the UK’s National Health Service (NHS). Images of ambulances backing up outside emergency departments and patients lying on trolleys in corridors haunt politicians and the public alike.

Demand on the NHS, which is always high, increases over the coldest of seasons, when threats to health are greatest. Generally, more than 20,000 extra deaths occur from December to March than in any other four-month period in England and Wales. That number varies considerably, however – from 17,460 in 2013-4 to 43,850 in 2014-5 (which was not even a particularly cold winter). And there has been no evidence of a decreasing trend since the early 1990s, despite the national flu immunisation programme.

The percentage increase in deaths seen each winter in England and Wales (21% last winter) is greater than in many other European countries. Perhaps surprisingly, Scandinavia appears to fare better, while some Mediterranean countries fare worse.

 

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